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Charity Money for Air Ambulance Stolen from Pub

Charity Money for Air Ambulance Stolen from Pub

This is one of those stories that just turns your stomach while reading. I’ve seen far too many stories like this one over the past few years (although even one is too many).

Once again, yet another sizable chunk of money has been stolen from an air ambulance charity in the UK.

Approximately 5000 GBP in cash (just about $8000 USD) that by all rights should go to the Dorset and Somerset air ambulance services has ended up in the hands of some two-bit thieves once again.

According to the article in This is Somerset, a pub called the Black Horse had been raising funds for the air ambulance charity in a re-used water cooler jug. Out of the goodness of their hearts, the pub’s regulars had been depositing cash to support the air ambulance in the bottle over the past year.

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FAA Approves Ornge to Fly U.S. Skies

FAA Approves Ornge to Fly U.S. Skies

Canada’s now-famous Ornge air ambulance service has been given permission by the FAA to fly its emergency transport helicopters in U.S. airspace.

Effectively, this means that that Ornge’s fleet of emergency air ambulances can now transport patients to and from any location in the United States.

What does it mean for patients? Well, it’s not that helicopter patient transports from Canada to the United States are all that common, or even typically necessary. However, according to the Interim CEO of Ornge, the newly granted permission gives patients “one more option to ensure [they] receive the care they need.”

The CEO of Windsor Regional Hospital expressed to the CBC that the FAA allowance will make it easier for Ontario citizens who need medical care while abroad in the United States to return home after they’ve been stabilized.

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Scan Patients’ Bodies Before Transport? London’s Air Ambulance Tests Out Vscan

Scan Patients’ Bodies Before Transport? London’s Air Ambulance Tests Out Vscan

For eight weeks, London’s Air Ambulance will be testing out General Electric Healthcare’s portable “Vscan,” which will allow them to non-invasively see inside a patient’s body before a transport.

The ultrasound device — roughly the size of one of today’s smartphones — is not only extremely portable, but also produces a clear, high-quality image for quick, accurate readings by clinicians in emergency situations.

Why is this so important? By scanning patients before an air transport, you can assess the presence of fluid in areas of the body and identify other life threatening conditions. Unchecked, fluid build-ups can cause compression of the heart, a condition that often requires an emergency surgical procedure.

According to GE Healthcare, London’s Air Ambulance is intending to use the Vscan for FAST scanning — Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma. This will, among other things, allow the emergency service to rapidly assess the presence of blood on the abdomen, pelvis, and pericardium.

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Air Ambulance Weekly is Now Air Medical Net

Air Ambulance Weekly is Now Air Medical Net

It’s official, Air Ambulance Weekly is now AirMedical.net. We hope we can continue to bring even greater articles and content to you from our new home. We also hope you’ll pardon our dust as we make sure the transition has gone without a hitch. If you do find any errors on our new site, please feel free to send us an e-mail and let us know!

What is Air Medical Net?

Air Medical Net (AirMedical.net) is a bi-weekly online magazine dedicated to discussing the latest news, topics, and issues facing professionals in the air medical transportation field. Readers of Air Medical Net are highly encouraged to follow us, get social, and add to the discussion with their knowledge and opinions.

Our blog provides a wide range of essential reading for pilots, air ambulance crews, as well as prospective users of air ambulance/medical charter services.

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Soldier in Critical Condition After 4,000ft Fall in Skydiving Training Exercise

Soldier in Critical Condition After 4,000ft Fall in Skydiving Training Exercise

A soldier who apparently lost control during a sky dive in Canada is in critical condition after being transported by air ambulance to Foothills Hospital. Amazingly — unbelievably– after falling from an altitude of 4,000 feet, the soldier survived.

An air ambulance service was called to the scene at Beiseker Airport, north-east of Calgary. The man had hit the ground hard after falling thousands of feet following a loss of control in the air.

Initial reports claimed that the soldier’s parachute had malfunctioned. However, the newest information says that the soldier lost control while trying to execute a 360 degree turn in the air as part of the training.

When he tried to execute the turn, the maneuver somehow turned into an out-of-control spin.

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