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C-17 Jets Converted to Air Ambulances Transport Soldiers Back Home for Treatment

C-17 Jets Converted to Air Ambulances Transport Soldiers Back Home for Treatment

Over the past few years, the US Army has been converting some of its Boeing C-17 Globemaster cargo jets into massive, flying intensive care units, meant to transport the war zone’s most seriously wounded soldiers. These patients travel in the arms of the Air National Guard Critical Care Air Transport Teams, with up to eight team members loading each patient, as well as over 100 pounds of connected medical equipment, onto the aircraft before a transport. The hulking C-17 has been described by one military officer as “the cadillac of medical evacuation aircraft.”

These critical care air medical flights are just a small part of evolutionary changes the U.S. military is making to speed the transport of wounded soldiers back to the United States for treatment. In the Vietnam War conflict, this process took an average of three weeks or more – a long time for any patient to wait for proper medical care. Today, with improvements to the air medical system such as the C-17 “flying hospitals,” soldiers requiring critical care can now be air transported home in as little as three days.

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Air Ambulance Bidding: Good or Bad for the Critical Care Patient?

Air Ambulance Bidding: Good or Bad for the Critical Care Patient?

The following story comes to us from a recent article posted on the Royal Gazette Online.

Back in 2005, so the story goes, a Bermuda Air Medivac air ambulance was preparing for takeoff on the runway when the patient being transported went into his third cardiac arrest. The vice president of BAM, Eloise Bell, halted the flight, and the medical team quickly resuscitated the patient. Bell immediately called the patient’s cardiologist, who advised her that if they were to bring the patient back to the hospital, he would surely die.

These are the kind of tough calls many air ambulance operators have to make on a routine basis. With the dire warning of the cardiologist taken into consideration, Bell decided the patient should be flown on to the United States, where he could receive specialized care for his condition. Following medical treatment in the U.S., the patient lived for several more years, thanks in part to that tough call made by Ms. Bell.

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The Emergency Rescue System of General Aviation Industry in China

The Emergency Rescue System of General Aviation Industry in China

Released by the Air Medical & Rescue Congress China 2011:

The general aviation industry as part of the current emergency rescue system for needs in China is increasingly important. Aircraft, especially fast, efficient helicopters less subject to geographical factors such as space constraints, are widely used in many countries as the most effective means of emergency rescue. Applications of emergency rescue helicopters include quickly reaching the water, the implementation of search and rescue at inaccessible spots on land, material transport, airborne command, and other tasks.

According to statistics, many countries have developed national conditions of the air rescue system. In the U.S. the rescue helicopters total nearly 10,000, in Canada there are more than 1,000, while our professional rescue fleet is only 30 planes, many of which are small tonnage. According to the survey, as of the end of 2010 there are only a little over 1,000 general aviation aircraft, with only 70 supporting the airport. This has seriously affected China’s general aviation industry and the development of our emergency rescue system.

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Pilots Say Trash, Birds will Endanger Aircraft at LaGuardia Airport

Pilots Say Trash, Birds will Endanger Aircraft at LaGuardia Airport

A proposed garbage transfer facility that would be built less than half a mile from the end of one of America’s busiest runways is drawing strong criticism. The site is to be constructed just just 2,206 feet – much, much lower than the FAA’s normal minimum distance of 10,000 feet – from LaGuardia Airport’s Runway 13/31.

Coincidentally, the waterside facility that would sit 2,200 feet away from Runway 13/31 would handle 2,200 tons of trash a day, as it transfers New York City’s garbage from trucks to barges. Although the trash will be stored in sealed containers and the overall area is designed to be enclosed, detractors say birds will be able to see and smell the garbage passing through, and are much more likely to be drawn into the path of aircraft taking off and landing.

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TN Considers Requiring A/C on Air Ambulances after Death of Heat Stroke Patient

TN Considers Requiring A/C on Air Ambulances after Death of Heat Stroke Patient

According to a recent article by Tom Wilemon from The Tennessean, it’s a common procedure in Tennessee for medical helicopters without air conditioning systems to fly critically-ill patients to their destinations, despite all ground ambulances in the state being required to have functional air conditioning systems installed.

Chris Yoder, a 24-year old mechanical engineer from North Carolina, suffered an apparent heat stroke during the Bonnaroo indie music festival in Manchester, Tennessee. He was transported to a Chattanooga-area hospital by air ambulance, where he passed away hours later. Evidence shows that the helicopter that transported him to the hospital was, possibly, not equipped with air conditioning.

His passing has opened up a debate on whether or not air ambulances in Tennessee should be mandated to have climate control systems installed. If the proposed new mandate passes, any existing air ambulances without A/C could be required to upgrade in order to continue operations in the state.

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