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London Air Ambulance Launches Online Interactive Mission Map

London Air Ambulance Launches Online Interactive Mission Map

Coming soon to a laptop near you: A London-based air ambulance service has just launched a novel new feature on their web site. The air ambulance’s Interactive Mission Map (which just seems like something that should have an acronym — we’ll say IMM for now) is a way for the charity-funded air medical organization to not only raise vital awareness of its activities, but remind computer-savvy Londoners of the critical service that they provide to the M25.

The online map displays the locations of emergency air ambulance missions carried out by London’s Air Ambulance. Currently, the interactive map displays missions going all the way back to January 1 of this year.

Via the Google Maps API integration, internet visitors to the web site can use their mouse to zero in on particular regions — large or small — and see exactly how often the air ambulance has been responding to transport calls in that area. By clicking on the individual markers or “pins” on the screen, you can even see more details about the particular missions: the incidents involved (such as falls, stabbings, car accidents, rail accidents, and so on) and the time the marker was last updated; talk about an innovative way to remind computer users how much we depend on air ambulance services.

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Safety Alert for EC135 Eurocopter after Crack Found in Rotor Hub

Safety Alert for EC135 Eurocopter after Crack Found in Rotor Hub

Across the pond last week, the European Aviation Safety Agency reportedly ordered a slew of safety checks on a type of rotor-wing aircraft that is currently utilized by various air ambulance services based in the United Kingdom.A fault in the body of the helicopter — one that could potentially lead to crashes if not addressed– was recently discovered in a specific helicopter used by a Scottish air ambulance.

The initial find by Bond Air Services consisted of a crack located on the main rotor hub of an EC135 Eurocopter. Upon learning of the anomaly, the EASA has mandated pre-flight checks for related safety issues on all EC135 until their full investigation into the problem is concluded.

The EASA claims that the underlying condition, if not corrected early on, could lead to advanced crack propagation, “possibly resulting in main rotor hub failure and consequent loss of the helicopter.”

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Missing Air Ambulance Crash Site Found in Chile

Missing Air Ambulance Crash Site Found in Chile

An INAER air ambulance that went missing over Chile on Thursday morning has been found. The plane crashed, and there are no survivors.

Eight people were on-board:

Nicolás Vidal Hamilton-Toovey, pilot
Hernán Soruco Angulo, co-pilot
Esperanza Sáez Díaz, patient
Luis Valenzuela Brito, husband of the patient
Paul Moya Manzor, flight nurse
Juan Cristóbal Rivera, paramedic
Juan Burcherd González, air crew member
Guillermo Severy Traversa, physician

At this time, the cause of the crash is not known.

Chilean aviation authorities have confirmed that the missing air ambulance, a 300-series twin-turboprop Beechcraft Super King Air, crashed near Puerto Aguirre, in the region of shared Argentinian-Chilean territory known as Patagonia. INAER’s CEO said that the pilots and crew had excellent knowledge and expertise, and that the plane was up-to-date regarding all required inspections and documentation.

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Ice Causes Air Ambulance to Skid off Alaska Runway

Ice Causes Air Ambulance to Skid off Alaska Runway

This month, the crew of a LifeMed-operated fixed-wing air ambulance transporting a patient narrowly averted a serious accident when the plane skidded off an Alaskan runway. Freezing temperatures and iced-over conditions upon the air ambulance’s descent into Ted Stevens International caused the plane to unexpectedly shift its position on the runway, or go into a “skid”.

The plane, owned by the Oregon-based air ambulance company Aero Air, is currently under lease to LifeMed Alaska. Thankfully, neither the crewmembers nor the patient experienced any injuries as a result of the incident. However, the jet, a Lear 35A, did sustain some degree of damage during the incident. The NTSB is still investigating the full extent of the damage.

The crew had just picked up a patient in Kenai and was on its way back to an Anchorage airport. As it approached the runway, The aircraft encountered “extensive icing” according to the News Tribune. The icing was apparently so extreme that the air ambulance’s anti-icing system proved to be ineffectual. Nevertheless, it was too late for the pilots to change their mind: they were committed to the approach. According to an NTSB investigator, poor visibility made it impossible for the pilots to see exactly where they were.

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British Air Ambulances to Carry Blood On-Board

British Air Ambulances to Carry Blood On-Board

According to a new BBC article (see link below) London’s Air Ambulance, the aptly-named London-based air ambulance service, is making UK air medical history. They are becoming the first air ambulance service in the country to carry blood on board. Will others begin to follow suit?

Despite state-of-the-art technology and modern comforts and conveniences that make some air ambulances, more and more, high-altitude intensive care units, very few air ambulances in the world actually carry blood on board. Australia, with its unique geography, is one such place where civilian air ambulances also carry blood on-board.

A new efficient refrigeration unit utilized by the American and British military (who carry blood on their rescue helicopters) will allow the civilian air ambulance service to safely carry blood supplies. This will allow transfusions to take place on scene rather than after the patient is airlifted back to the hospital. London’s Air Ambulance believes hundreds of lives could be saved by this new development.

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